This video supports the edited volume Cradled By Conflict: Child Involvement with Armed Groups in Contemporary Conflict ( https://unu.edu/children-and-extreme-violence ). The volume analyses the evidence for how and why children become associated with, used by, and exit armed groups and considers how the international community can improve its efforts to prevent and respond to child recruitment. The volume specifically addresses the widely held assumption that there is something exceptional about the nature of contemporary conflicts and the armed groups fighting in them that requires unique policy and programmatic responses.

The volume presents analysis based on original case study research, extensive interviews with key stakeholders, focus group discussions, and survey work. In each case study, a scrupulous effort was made to engage children and youth to understand their experiences.

For more information and to download the volume visit: https://unu.edu/children-and-extreme-violence


This video supports the edited volume Cradled By Conflict: Child Involvement with Armed Groups in Contemporary Conflict ( https://unu.edu/children-and-extreme-violence ). The volume analyses the evidence for how and why children become associated with, used by, and exit armed groups and considers how the international community can improve its efforts to prevent and respond to child recruitment. The volume specifically addresses the widely held assumption that there is something exceptional about the nature of contemporary conflicts and the armed groups fighting in them that requires unique policy and programmatic responses.

The volume presents analysis based on original case study research, extensive interviews with key stakeholders, focus group discussions, and survey work. In each case study, a scrupulous effort was made to engage children and youth to understand their experiences.

For more information and to download the volume visit: https://unu.edu/children-and-extreme-violence


This video supports the edited volume Cradled By Conflict: Child Involvement with Armed Groups in Contemporary Conflict ( https://unu.edu/children-and-extreme-violence ). The volume analyses the evidence for how and why children become associated with, used by, and exit armed groups and considers how the international community can improve its efforts to prevent and respond to child recruitment. The volume specifically addresses the widely held assumption that there is something exceptional about the nature of contemporary conflicts and the armed groups fighting in them that requires unique policy and programmatic responses.

The volume presents analysis based on original case study research, extensive interviews with key stakeholders, focus group discussions, and survey work. In each case study, a scrupulous effort was made to engage children and youth to understand their experiences.

For more information and to download the volume visit: https://unu.edu/children-and-extreme-violence


This video supports the edited volume Cradled By Conflict: Child Involvement with Armed Groups in Contemporary Conflict ( https://unu.edu/children-and-extreme-violence ). The volume analyses the evidence for how and why children become associated with, used by, and exit armed groups and considers how the international community can improve its efforts to prevent and respond to child recruitment. The volume specifically addresses the widely held assumption that there is something exceptional about the nature of contemporary conflicts and the armed groups fighting in them that requires unique policy and programmatic responses.

The volume presents analysis based on original case study research, extensive interviews with key stakeholders, focus group discussions, and survey work. In each case study, a scrupulous effort was made to engage children and youth to understand their experiences.

For more information and to download the volume visit: https://unu.edu/children-and-extreme-violence


This video supports the edited volume Cradled By Conflict: Child Involvement with Armed Groups in Contemporary Conflict ( https://unu.edu/children-and-extreme-violence ). The volume analyses the evidence for how and why children become associated with, used by, and exit armed groups and considers how the international community can improve its efforts to prevent and respond to child recruitment. The volume specifically addresses the widely held assumption that there is something exceptional about the nature of contemporary conflicts and the armed groups fighting in them that requires unique policy and programmatic responses.

The volume presents analysis based on original case study research, extensive interviews with key stakeholders, focus group discussions, and survey work. In each case study, a scrupulous effort was made to engage children and youth to understand their experiences.

For more information and to download the volume visit: https://unu.edu/children-and-extreme-violence


This video supports the edited volume Cradled By Conflict: Child Involvement with Armed Groups in Contemporary Conflict ( https://unu.edu/children-and-extreme-violence ). The volume analyses the evidence for how and why children become associated with, used by, and exit armed groups and considers how the international community can improve its efforts to prevent and respond to child recruitment. The volume specifically addresses the widely held assumption that there is something exceptional about the nature of contemporary conflicts and the armed groups fighting in them that requires unique policy and programmatic responses.

The volume presents analysis based on original case study research, extensive interviews with key stakeholders, focus group discussions, and survey work. In each case study, a scrupulous effort was made to engage children and youth to understand their experiences.

For more information and to download the volume visit: https://unu.edu/children-and-extreme-violence


"Challenges and Opportunities for the New UN Secretary-General”, a Conversation with Sam Daws, Director of the Project on UN Governance and Reform at the University of Oxford.

Dr Daws joins UNU Rector David M. Malone for a conversation assessing the future of the UN at a time of challenge, and how its new Secretary-General, António Guterres, can steer the organisation towards an era of opportunities.

From protracted conflicts in the Middle East and Africa to mass migration and climate change, the world is facing increasing challenges that no country can solve alone. Despite the need for coordinated regional or international responses, scepticism over the value and relevance of multilateral institutions is on the rise. This loss of confidence in multilateralism by some — alongside the shifting of world political and economic power towards the south and the east, and the complexities of tackling endemic poverty and global warming — will place the United Nations under increasing pressure to meet the demands of changing times. Will the UN be able to innovate and adapt its structures? Will it be able to attract young and new talent? And can the UN develop dynamic partnerships to move the organisation forward?

About the speaker

Sam Daws is Director of the Project on UN Governance and Reform at the University of Oxford. Over the last 30 years, he has held a variety of UN-related positions. From 2012 to 2013, he served as Deputy Director for the Cabinet Office (United Kingdom), advising the prime minister and his envoy on the establishment of the Sustainable Development Goals. Previously, he held the position of Senior Principal Research Analyst in the Multilateral Policy Directorate of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (UK). From 2000 to 2003, Dr Daws served as First Officer in the Executive Office of UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan. He became Executive Director of the United Nations Association-UK in 2004, and was then appointed as Senior Advisor and UK representative to the United Nations Foundation.

Dr Daws has published 13 books on the UN. He co-edited The Oxford Handbook on the United Nations (2008), and The United Nations (2015), an eight-volume collection of journal articles on the organisation. He also co-authored The United Nations: A Concise Political Guide (1994), and The Procedure of the UN Security Council (2014).


Mr Paul Tange joins UNU Rector David M. Malone for a conversation on the future of Japanese architecture, as well as on his plans for the facility for aquatic sports for the Tokyo 2020 Games.

The leading quality of Japanese architecture has been appreciated worldwide. Among the prominent architects of our times is Kenzō Tange, and his son, Paul Tange. Valued not only for their architectural innovations, but also for their contributions to Japanese society, Tange Associates has played an important role in Japan’s post-disaster recovery processes since the end of World War II. From designing the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum to designing the Rikuzentakata Community Hall following the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake, the Tange family has continually created space for advancing peace, resilience, and sustainable development.

About the speaker

Paul Noritaka Tange is Chairman of Tange Associates. After receiving his AB and Master of Architecture from Harvard University, he began his architectural career at Kenzō Tange Associates under the guidance of his father, and world-renowned architect, Kenzō Tange. Mr Paul Tange became President of the architecture firm in 1997, and founded Tange Associates in 2002. He is a registered architect in both Japan and Singapore.

The Tange family has produced numerous notable works of architecture, including the Yoyogi National Gymnasium for the 1964 Summer Olympics (Japan), the Mode Gakuen Cocoon Tower (Japan), the United Nations University Headquarters building (Japan), the BMW Italia Headquarters building (Italy), and the Bank of Shanghai Headquarters Building (China), among others.


Matsushima Bay in Miyagi Prefecture, considered one of the “three most scenic spots of Japan”, contains four inhabited islands called the Urato Islands, all of which were seriously damaged in the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami. Since the disasters, various types of support and projects have been implemented for recovery and restoration of the region. This video features beautiful footage of landscapes and livelihood activities in the Urato Islands.

This video was filmed as a side project to the video “Bouncing Back from Disaster – People Working with Nature to Create a Brighter Future for the Urato Islands”.

For the main production, “Bouncing Back from Disaster”, please see: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=codbe9IRmOw

日本三景にも数えられる松島湾には、豊かな里山と里海に恵まれた有人島があります。浦戸諸島は、2011年の東日本大震災と津波により大きな被害を受けましたが、現在さまざまな復興の取り組みが進められています。この浦戸諸島の美しい風景や人々の営みを映像作品にまとめました。(この映像は、「震災をともに乗り越える人々〜自然の恵みを活かす、浦戸諸島の復興」の製作にあたって撮影された映像をもとに構成されています。

映像作品:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zqk9_ETOIC4


Oyster cultivation is one of the major industries in the Urato Islands in Matsushima Bay, Miyagi Prefecture — one of the “three most scenic spots of Japan”. With abundant nature in their seascapes, the Urato Islands are famous for not only cultivating oysters, but also exporting seed oysters to other oyster-producing sites both in Japan and abroad. This video gives an overview of the islands as a “home of oysters”.

This video was filmed as a side project to the video “Bouncing Back from Disaster – People Working with Nature to Create a Brighter Future for the Urato Islands”.

For the main production, “Bouncing Back from Disaster”, please see: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=codbe9IRmOw

日本三景のひとつ、松島湾に浮かぶ浦戸諸島(宮城県塩釜市)は、牡蠣(かき)養殖が主要産業の1つとなっています。豊かな浦戸諸島の里海では、食用の牡蠣だけではなく、国内外の牡蠣産地に送られる種(たね)牡蠣の生産も行われています。牡蠣がどのように育てられ、出荷されていくのか。そんな牡蠣のふるさとの様子を映像作品にまとめました。
(この映像は、「震災をともに乗り越える人々〜自然の恵みを活かす、浦戸諸島の復興」の製作にあたって撮影された映像をもとに構成されています。)

映像作品:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zqk9_ETOIC4


A conversation with Ambassador Colin Keating, former Representative for New Zealand on the UN Security Council.

The Asian region has become a source of global geo-strategic stress. From the slowly escalating tensions with North Korea to the crisis in Syria, the UN Security Council has failed to maintain international peace and security as it was mandated to do. Instead, the Security Council has often been relegated to managing the consequences of civil war — a task it was not designed for and struggles to perform. How can the Security Council reassert its leadership on peace and security issues within the Asian region? What actions are needed for the Security Council to fulfil its mandate?

Ambassador Keating joins Mr Sebastian von Einsiedel, Director of the UNU Centre for Policy Research, for a conversation on how the UN Security Council can better fulfil its mandate to maintain peace and security in the face the challenges posed by North Korea, Syria, and other crises in the Asian region.

About the speaker

Colin Keating is a distinguished former New Zealand diplomat and public servant. He is recognised as a leading global authority on the UN Security Council. Until recently, he served as Special Adviser for New Zealand’s 2015/16 term on the UN Security Council and, prior, he was Special Envoy for the Prime Minister of New Zealand. From 2005 to 2011, he was the founding Executive Director of Security Council Report, a monitoring organisation in New York, and concurrently, Senior Research Fellow at Columbia University.

From 1993 to 1996, Keating served as the New Zealand Ambassador to the United Nations in New York and represented New Zealand on the Security Council. He was Council President during the 1994 genocide in Rwanda and led the Council Mission to Somalia. He also chaired the Security Council Committee on Sanctions against Iraq and was actively involved in reforming the United Nations, serving as Co-Chair of the General Assembly working group on UN reform.


"The Extinction Market: Wildlife Trafficking in Asia”, a Conversation with Vanda Felbab-Brown

Poaching and wildlife trafficking are rife, yet there is still no consensus on how to combat them. The impacts of these practices extend far beyond the devastating loss of biodiversity and can be a threat to national security, human security, and economic development — particularly of forest-dependent communities. The challenges faced in Asia, with an illegal market worth millions of dollars, is significant and requires high-level policy responses. But how can wildlife trafficking be combatted? And are there initiatives from other areas, such as drug trafficking, which can help shape effective policy responses?

Dr Felbab-Brown joins Mr Sebastian von Einsiedel, Director of the UNU Centre for Policy Research, for a conversation on how to balance the interests of local, national, and transnational actors in the fight against wildlife trafficking, and Asia’s role in this illegal trade.

About the speaker

Dr Vanda Felbab-Brown is Senior Fellow at the Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence in the Foreign Policy program at the Brookings Institution. Her most recent book, The Extinction Market: Wildlife Trafficking and How to Counter It (2017), provides a global perspective on wildlife trafficking and policy-oriented solutions.

Dr Felbab-Brown is a leading expert on conflict, non-traditional security threats, and illicit economies such as drug trafficking, wildlife trafficking, and illegal logging and mining. She has authored a range of policy reports, academic articles, and books in her area of expertise, for which she has received numerous awards. She also provides regular briefings for the US administration, the United Nations, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, and NATO.

Prior to Brookings, Dr Felbab-Brown was Assistant Professor at the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University, and has taught at universities and military schools across the United States and Europe. She holds a PhD in political science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (2007) and a BA from Harvard University (1999).


The Middle East faces many harsh challenges. Unresolved conflicts, violent extremism, and deep divisions among key regional actors continue to destabilise the region. This instability has affected not only the Middle East, but has been felt across the globe. At the same time, hope remains for peace and resolution, especially among the younger generation who have been instrumental in agitating for change. But is stability in the Middle East possible? And what support is needed from the international community to achieve this?

Sir Derek Plumbly joins Mr Adam Day, Senior Policy Adviser at the UNU Centre for Policy Research, for a conversation on building peace in the Middle East, and the actions needed from key regional and international actors to achieve stability in the region.

About the speaker

Derek Plumbly is Visiting Professor of Middle Eastern Studies at King’s College London and Chair of the Arab British Centre. From 2012 to 2015, he served as the United Nations Under-Secretary-General and Special Coordinator for Lebanon. From 2008 to 2011, he headed the international commission monitoring the implementation of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement in Sudan. Prior, he held a number of distinguished posts in the British foreign service, such as Ambassador to the Arab Republic of Egypt (2003-2007); Ambassador to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (2000-2003); Director for the Middle East and North Africa in the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (1997-2000); Head of Chancery at the United Kingdom’s Permanent Mission to the United Nations in New York (1992-1996); and Deputy head of mission in Riyadh (1988-1992).


Dr. Pietro Bartolo delivers the UNU-GCM 2017 Annual Guest Lecture entitled, 'Let's not think of them as clandestine migrants.'

Watch the whole event here.


Let’s not think of them as clandestine migrants

UNU-GCM is pleased to announce that Doctor Pietro Bartolo will give our 2017 Annual Guest Lecture on Saturday, November 18th, at the Sant Pau Art Nouveau Site, Barcelona.