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The bright band in the left half of the image is the Milky Way, where most of the stars in our Galaxy reside. The animation starts with the Orion constellation at the centre; we then move towards the neighbouring Taurus constellation and to the Hyades star cluster, which is part of this constellation. Hyades is the closest open cluster to the Solar System, some 150 light-years away.

The animation first shows the 3D structure of the cluster, based on accurate position and distance information from Gaia. Then an animated view of the future motions of stars is shown – both in Hyades and beyond. This is based on Gaia’s measurements of the velocity of stars across the sky, also known as proper motion.

Credit: ESA/Gaia/DPAC

Acknowledgement: Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC); Gaia Sky; S. Jordan / T. Sagristà, Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Germany

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In future data releases, Gaia will also provide asteroid spectra and enable a complete characterisation of the asteroid belt. The combination of dynamical and physical information that is being collected by Gaia provides an unprecedented opportunity to improve our understanding of the origin and the evolution of the Solar System.

Credit: ESA/Gaia/DPAC

Acknowledgement: Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC); Orbits: Gaia Coordinating Unit 4; P. Tanga, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, France; F. Spoto, IMCCE, Observatoire de Paris, France; Animation: Gaia Sky; S. Jordan / T. Sagristà, Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Germany

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After a few seconds, the stars start moving in the sky according to parallax, an apparent shift caused by Earth’s yearly motion around the Sun. Then, constellation outlines appear as visual aids. Finally, stars start moving according to their true motion through space, which is visible on the sky as proper motion.

Parallaxes and proper motions have been exaggerated by 100 000 to make them visible in this animation.

This animation is based on data from the second data release of ESA’s Gaia satellite, which has measured the positions, parallaxes and motions of more than one billion stars across the sky to unprecedented accuracy.

Credit: ESA/Gaia/DPAC

Acknowledgement: Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC); Gaia Sky; S. Jordan / T. Sagristà, Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Germany

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The spacecraft really do depart from Schiphol; along with essential ground-support equipment they are scheduled to fly in a series of Antonov aircraft during the last week of April and first week of May. Upon arrival at Kourou, an intensive six-months of preparations will prepare the mission for launch. The launch window opens 5 October until 29 November 2018.

Find out more about the BepiColombo mission on esa.int/bepicolombo

Credits: ESA

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Scientists who have been working on creating and validating the data contained in the catalogue tell us why they are waiting for this extraordinary release.

Featured in the video: Antonella Vallenari (INAF, Astronomical Observatory of Padua), Anthony Brown (Leiden University), Timo Prusti (European Space Agency), Annie Robin (Institut UTINAM, OSU THETA Franche-Comté-Bourgogne), Laurent Eyer (University of Geneva) and Federica Spoto (IMCCE, Observatory of Paris).

A media briefing on the second Gaia data release will be held at the ILA Berlin Air and Space Show in Germany on 25 April 11:00-12:15 CEST. Watch the webstream at www.esa.int/live

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Bob Brewin is pioneering a new technique in satellite oceanography - by going surfing.
The Plymouth Marine Laboratory scientist uses his board to take sea surface temperature measurements, and then use them to better interpret data from European satellite Sentinel-3.

This video is also available in the following languages:
German: https://youtu.be/1dU52RA1IEE
French: https://youtu.be/kSJXmrSWG-s
Italian: https://youtu.be/PRPvcvZgQno
Spanish: https://youtu.be/H0vQdyanyKk
Portuguese: https://youtu.be/_nP6Bmpa6YQ
Greek: https://youtu.be/y4zObvFjckY
Hungarian: https://youtu.be/kj3-iO2S4UQ

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Ο Μπομο Μπρούιν ίναι πρωτοπόρος σε μια νέα τεχνική στη δορυφορική ωκεανογραφία - κάνοντας σέρφινγκ. Η ιδέα του είναι να χρησιμοποιήσει την σανίδα του για να μετρήσει τη θερμοκρασία της θάλασσας και στη συνέχεια να χρησιμοποιήσει τα στοιχεία αυτά για να ερμηνεύσει καλύτερα τα δεδομένα του ευρωπαϊκού δορυφόρου Sentinel-3.

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Bob Brewin ist der Erfinder einer neuen Technik in der Satelliten-Ozeanographie - er arbeitet auf dem Surfbrett.

Er hatte die Idee, mit seinem Board die Temperatur der Meeresoberfläche zu messen, um damit die Daten des europäischen Satelliten Sentinel-3 besser interpretieren zu können. Und es gibt einen Grund für diese Messungen erklärt Bob Brewin, Wissenschaftler am Plymouth Marine Labor.

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Utilizando la tabla de surf, se puede medir la temperatura de la superficie del mar, y cruzar esos datos con los de los satélites Sentinel-3.
El último satélite de Copernicus, Sentinel-3B, controlará los efectos del cambio climático en el mar y los océanos.

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Bob Brewin est l'inventeur d'une nouvelle technique en océanographie par satellite, en surfant. Son idée est simple : mesurer la température de l'eau grâce à un appareil fixé sur son surf et comparer ses données avec les données du satellite européen Sentinel-3. Et cela peut être très utile.

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Bob Brewin úttörő technikát próbál ki a műholdas óceanográfiában - úgy, hogy szörfözni megy.

Arra használja a deszkáját, hogy megmérje a tenger felszínének hőmérsékletét, és értelmezze az adatokat,amelyeket az európai Sentinel-3 műhold küldött.

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Bob Brewin é cientista utiliza uma técnica pioneira na recolha de imagens em oceanografia, uma técnica que passa pelo surf. O aparelho que equipa as pranchas chama-se SmartFin.
Usa a prancha para medir a superfície das águas, recolhendo dados que conjuga com as informações do satélite Sentinel 3. Um método muito inovador.

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Jeremy Wilks, in questa puntata di Space si occupa di oceani e della ricerca che riguarda la superficie dei mari. Dal Nord della Francia per osservare le alghe fino al sud dell'Inghilterra dove anche i surfisti possono contribuire alla ricerca, tutto questo grazie all'utilizzo dei satelliti.

Bob Brewin sta testando una nuova tecnica nell'oceanografia mediante l'uso dei satelliti, grazie al surf.

La sua idea è di utilizzare la tavola per misurare la temperatura superficiale del mare, per poi sfruttare queste misurazioni per capire meglio i dati che arrivano dal satellite europeo Sentinella-3.

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